North Phoenix

Desert Ridge Market Update

The Desert Ridge area is located in the far North Central section of Phoenix, and covers several new-ish neighborhoods just north of the Loop 101 freeway, between Scottsdale Road and Cave Creek Road.


Most housing in the Desert Ridge area was built between the mid 1990s and the early 2000s.  Almost all housing is wood frame covered by painted stucco, with concrete tile roofs. This is standard for construction in this age range. While most homes built were single-family detached, there were a few condos and townhomes built as well.


There are several factors that make the area desirable to many buyers:

  • Beautiful views of the surrounding mountains, with nearby hiking  recreation areas;

  • A gigantic shopping mall at the intersection of Tatum Road and the Loop 101; and

  • The area lies within the Paradise Valley school district, widely believed to be the best in the metro region and possibly the best in the state


Homes for Sale in Desert Ridge

  • Active Listings: 29 homes (view these homes)

  • AWC Listings: 8 homes (what is AWC?)

  • Pending Listings: 18 homes

  • Sold Listings, past 90 days: 35 sales


Desert Ridge Price Information

  • Average List Price: $152.23 per square foot (last update: $150.90/sf)

  • Average AWC Price: $128.81 per square foot (last update: $125.29/sf

  • Average Pending Price: $136.31 per square foot (last update: $135.74/sf)

  • Average Sold Price: $130.60 per square foot (last update: $134.33/sf)

  • List Price to Sold Price Ratio: 107.21% (last update: 96.82%)


Average Days on Market for Desert Ridge homes = 64 days (last update: 121 days)

Popular Desert Ridge area Home Searches:

Moon Valley market update, 5-31-11

Market Update, moon valley mapMoon Valley is located in North Central Phoenix, and covers the mature neighborhoods between Thunderbird Road and Bell Road, and between 7th Street and about 15th Avenue.

Homes for Sale/Sold in Moon Valley

  • Active Listings: 7 homes (view these homes)
  • AWC Listings: 2 homes (what is AWC?)
  • Pending Listings: 7 homes
  • Sold Listings, past 90 days: 10 sales

Moon Valley Price Information

  • Average List Price: $339,500
  • Average AWC Price: $239,500
  • Average Pending Price: $186,100
  • Average Sold Price: $282,750

List Price to Sold Price Ratio: 89.80%
Average Days on Market for Moon Valley homes = 95 days

Popular Moon Valley area Home Searches:

“Information in this article is based on single family home sale information from the Arizona Regional Multiple Listing Service (”ARMLS”), for May 2011. ARMLS does not guarantee information accuracy.  Data maintained by ARMLS may not reflect all real estate activity in the market.”

Desert Ridge Market Update

Market Update, Desert Ridge MapThe Desert Ridge area is located in the far North Central section of Phoenix, and covers several new-ish neighborhoods just north of the Loop 101 freeway, between Scottsdale Road and Cave Creek Road.

Most housing in the Desert Ridge area was built between the mid 1990s and the early 2000s.  Almost all housing is wood frame covered by painted stucco, with concrete tile roofs. This is standard for construction in this age range. While most homes built were single-family detached, there were a few condos and townhomes built as well.

There are several factors that make the area desirable to many buyers:


  • Beautiful views of the surrounding mountains, with nearby hiking  recreation areas;


  • A gigantic shopping mall at the intersection of Tatum Road and the Loop 101; and


  • The area lies within the Paradise Valley school district, widely believed to be the best in the metro region and possibly the best in the state


Homes for Sale in Desert Ridge

  • Active Listings: 33 homes (view these homes)

  • AWC Listings: 13 homes (what is AWC?)

  • Pending Listings: 20 homes

  • Sold Listings, past 90 days: 35 sales


Desert Ridge Price Information

  • Average List Price: $150.90 per square foot

  • Average AWC Price: $125.29 per square foot

  • Average Pending Price: $135.74 per square foot

  • Average Sold Price: $134.33 per square foot

  • List Price to Sold Price Ratio: 96.82%


Average Days on Market for Desert Ridge homes = 121 days

Popular Desert Ridge area Home Searches:

Moon Valley Market Update

Moon Valley market update graphicMoon Valley is located in the North Central section of Phoenix, and covers the mature neighborhoods between Thunderbird Road and Bell Road, and between 7th Street and about 15th Avenue.

 

Homes for Sale in Moon Valley


  • Active Listings: 7 homes (view these homes)


  • AWC Listings: 3 homes (what is AWC?)


  • Pending Listings: 5 homes


  • Sold Listings, past 90 days: 3 sales


Moon Valley Price Information


  • Average List Price: $236,200


  • Average AWC Price: $164,300


  • Average Pending Price: $278,400


  • Average Sold Price: $279,200

  • List Price to Sold Price Ratio: 91.84%


Average Days on Market for Moon Valley homes = 67 days

 

Popular Moon Valley area Home Searches:

 

“Information in this article is based on single family home sale information from the Arizona Regional Multiple Listing Service (”ARMLS”), for April 2011. ARMLS does not guarantee information accuracy.  Data maintained by ARMLS may not reflect all real estate activity in the market.”

Photographing the front of your house

Sometimes a head-on shot of the exterior front of a house isn’t the best way to showcase what the home has to offer.


2 story head on


Sometimes you should take a picture from an angle you’d never normally use.


2 story from side


That’s the same house and the two pictures were taken within about 60 seconds of each other. You’d hardly even know it. While it’s a very unusual angle for a real estate “front” photo, I’d argue that picture number 2 is the better way to showcase this home.


thoughts?

Fabulous, but too far out. . .

Recently a client and I exchanged emails about her housing options that reminded me of one of most enduring metro Phoenix’s real estate truisms:  fabulous is often also too far out (geographically speaking).


Since metro Phoenix has always had room to grow, geographically, it generally follows that the newer, fancier, nicer houses that many 20-something, 30-something and 40-something buyers want are miles out of town.


We had a saying during the boom years of 2004-2006 that buyers "drive until they qualify" meaning they drive out from center city until they hit a pocket where the builders have put up houses that those buyers can afford.


But really it's also true that buyers drive until they find the finishes & fixtures they desire at a price they can pay.


.


So what we often find is this . . . .



5 miles (7-12 minutes) from downtown Phoenix your budget of $150,000 buys this:


160k buys this 5miles from Phx downtown


160k buys this 5miles from Phx downtown, KIT





  • about 1,200 to 1,400 square foot


  • 2 or 3 bedrooms ; 2 bathrooms


  • 1/4 acre lot, with no pool


  • built in 1950s


  • No HOA; you could add on another bedroom fairly easily


  • linoleum floors & laminate counters


  • overall, looks like it was remodeled on the cheap in late 1980s


10 to 12 miles (20-25 minutes) from downtown Phoenix that same $150,000 buys this:


150k buys this 12miles from Phx downtown, EF





  • 1,500 to 1,800 square feet


  • often with a pool ; usually about the same 1/4 acre lot as above


  • Built in the 1970s or 1980s


  • Probably no HOA


You can choose between an older kitchen in a fairly nice neighborhood. . .


150k buys this 12miles from Phx downtown, old KIT, nice NEIGH


. . . or you can choose a completely remodeled kitchen in a neighborhood most buyers would consider a step down from the neighborhood above.


150k buys this 12miles from Phx downtown, new KIT, lesser NEIGH



20-25 miles (45-60 minutes!) from downtown Phoenix $150,000 buys this. . .


150k buys this 20miles from Phx downtown, EF


150k buys this 20miles from Phx downtown, KIT


150k buys this 20miles from Phx downtown, BA





  • 1700-1900 square feet


  • rarely with a pool ; usually a small 1/10th of an acre (5,550 square feet)


  • Brand new build house or about 3-5 years old


  • HOA controls much of what you can do to the outside of the house


What’s more important to you - ?


Granite countertops and new cabinets or a quick 5 minute commute to downtown Phoenix?


5-year old house with generally poor insulation or a well-insulated 40 to 60 year old house that probably needs a new roof in the coming 5 years?


A little elbow room in your backyard or trying to plant a hedge to hide the 2-story house looming over your tiny backyard?



Long time readers know or will guess that I’d choose the teensy 1950s house over the new build in Surprise or Avondale every time. And that’s not just because I don’t have children. I’d raise kids in that teensy house in a heartbeat. They'll have more quality time with Mommy & Daddy because my commute to work is only about 8 minutes.

What about you?

With MLS photos, details really matter

Before


what a difference a door makes, before

After


what a difference a door makes, after

There are a few crucial details that made the After picture much more appealing (not counting the angle at which the photos were taken):




  • red door

  • black shutters

  • green grass

  • possibly fresh granite gravel in the semi-circle shape

  • flowerbed filled with red flowers

  • white window rollershades all the way down


Red shows up exceptionally well on the Internet, where something like 90% of home buyers start their search. Yellow is the same. The contrast between the black shutters & white house is also eye-catching.


Usually I don’t recommend or like head-on photos of the front of a home. It tends to make the house look one-dimensional, as if it could be a movie facade. But in this case, it works, proving there’s an exception to every rule.


I'm betting the cash outlay for this seller was about $200 for the door, $120 for shutters and another $100 or $150 for the plants. Granite gravel can be pricey, as can sod. But as you can see, the results are beautiful and buyers will respond by coming to look in person.


More proof that a couple hundred of these


Image ID 377234 by Stock Exchange user ede design ($1 bill picture courtesy of Stock Exchange user Leonardini)


can frequently get you several dozen of these


Dollars seamless background. ($100 bill picture courtesy of Stock Exchange user ede design)


at closing time.



Photo credits - Joanna Siravo of Coldwell Banker and Lisa M. Juel of John Hall & Associates. Disclosure: photos were taken about 3 years apart, this wasn’t a seller doing a fix-up before listing for sale. This Realtor was not involved in the sale of the home in either time frame.

Recommended blog and handyman

Psst...  I found a really outstanding blog and an excellent craftsman who does home remodeling projects in the Greater Phoenix area: The RemodGeek. I can't say enough good stuff about him, but his resume actually speaks for itself:
…spent years in construction, residential and commercial, and remodeling from foundation to punch list. I have been a Union  Carpenter, (both wood and steel stud), Remodeling Contractor, Crew Foreman, Superintendent, Project Manager, Cabinet Maker,  (both custom and production) Professional Drywaller, (from single family houses, and commercial drywall, including fire safety renovations, multi-hour drywall assemblies, elevator shafts, lead-lined radiation rooms, and fire rated partitions. If it can be covered in drywall, I have probably done it, multiple times.

I worked in the auto recycling (junkyards) and bodyshop business for 9 years. When I am not remodeling, I build websites, specialty computers, and networks for my internet clients.

Remodeling for Geeks masthead

That’s his blog masthead; it's him reflected in a shiny engine block. It's a good example of the creative level of photography the RemodGeek posts.  In the funny way of the Internet, RemodGeek and I haven’t met in person, yet. We've emailed, and his blog's in my feed reader.

No matter. The high level of quality craftsmanship he puts into his remodeling projects is crystal clear. If you need remodeling work done around the house, or just need advice on your next Do It Yourself project, check out his site.  <link : http://www.lemurzone.com/rfg/>

Note: Author was given nothing of value other than goodwill in consideration for writing & posting this piece. Whenever you're hiring people to do work on/in your home, do your homework: references, licenses, Better Business Bureau, Registrar of Contractors, etc. ThePhoenixAgents recommends vendors from time to time because we were impressed by them, not because we guarantee their work.

Move In Ready in North Phoenix

We have the most adorable, spic-and-span clean, move in ready house for sale and wanted to take a minute to tell y’all about it. You can see more pictures and info at http://phoenixhomes411.blogspot.com/.




  • great North Phoenix location

  • $129,950

  • 3 bedrooms

  • 2-1/2 baths

  • 1,753 square feet

  • built 2004 on a corner lot

  • all tile roof, stucco exterior

  • backyard has grassy area, extended covered patio, small desert landscaped area too

  • tons of storage inside & out

  • walk in closets in every bedroom, even a walk in kitchen pantry


Reany-mls-18

Reany-mls-0

Reany-mls-6

Reany-mls-17

Reany-mls-16

Long time readers know that I can get pretty worked up about certain things in the housing market. One of them is homes that are really well maintained, show well, and are such a great value. With these homes, I can find myself wound up to the point where I can hardly stand it that someone hasn’t pounced on the great deal I know about.


This is one of those homes! Go check out our home showcase website to find out more.



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Just a Pretty Picture

Nothing more than a pretty picture here today. The world’s full to overbrimming with doom and gloom. I hope this will help.



Calle de los Arboles neighborhood 009

Taken in the Cave Creek neighborhood of Calle de los Arboles, spring 2009.


Click to view all Cave Creek homes for sale (or in any other neighborhood for that matter).


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Photos Make a Huge Difference Too

I’m piling on to Chris’ post yesterday about how staging can determine whether buyers make offers or make tracks.


Pictures make a huge difference too. Buyers love LOTS of pictures. Quantity doesn’t substitute for quality however.


A word about the condo Chris wrote about yesterday, with the fabulous view. We both agreed it was one of the best, and possibly the best view we’d ever seen. Between us we’ve been showing homes for 9 years so we’ve seen a lot of view variations.


I tell you, I was literally transfixed by the view from this condo; it stopped me in my tracks. Had I been shopping, I'd have whipped out my checkbook right there and offered the seller full list price. I don’t think Chris stressed enough that you could see all of these in a 180 degree panorama off the balcony:





  • The McDowells


  • Camelback Mountain


  • Mummy Mountain


  • Squaw Peak / Piestawa Peak


  • South Mountain


  • The Estrellas


  • North Mountain


This? Is the only view picture the listing shows:



Grayhawk blah condo only view pic

I don’t know about you, but all I see in that picture is some scrub desert and bird poop dripping down the balcony wall.


Sellers, make sure that if your property has a remarkable feature, it’s pictured prominently in the MLS listing your Realtor creates.


Buyers, looking for a drop dead view at bargain basement prices? This view on a luxury estate is easily worth $2 million. You can own the view and the cute 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo that surrounds it for $149,500. It's bank owned and priced to move, so don't dawdle.


Phoenix is a Big Grid

Here’s a bit of handy introduction-to-the-Valley sort of info about Phoenix’s street system.

phx is a grid map (click to enlarge/”back” to return)

Thoughtfully, our Phoenician forebears laid out our fair city on a big grid. Nearly every street is straight and major streets are 1 mile apart. Numbered streets go north & south, named streets go east-west.

lost already?
try Chris' much more concise post about driving about Phoenix,
or a humorous take on driving in Greater Phoenix


Obviously the big yellow lines are freeways (check out our funky freeway names). The smaller yellow lines on the map above are the major streets crossing Phoenix. Where the major streets cross each other you can count on a huge intersection (4 to 10 lanes wide!) and probably strip mall shopping.

Check out a few of the bigger shopping areas by seeing the Google maps Street View of these intersections: Tatum and Shea, Camelback & 20th Street35th Avenue and Glendale.

North-South Streets Are Numbered


All the north-south streets start out on the grid counting from Central Avenue, which is “0”. Heading east from Central Avenue, you’ll cross 1st Street, 2nd Street, 3rd Street, and so on.

Heading west from Central, you’ll cross over 1st Avenue, 2nd Avenue (you get the picture by now). The I-17 freeway interrupts at about 27th Avenue, and then you’re off again, hitting major streets at 1-mile intervals.

“The Sevens” (7th Street and 7th Avenue) are major traffic arteries for mid-town Phoenicians. During rush hour, they become reversible travel lanes, lovingly called “suicide lanes” by long-time residents. Don’t want to risk the suicide lanes? Check out this post where I blogged about my bus ride up and down the 7th Street route.

East-West Streets Are Named


The major east-west streets are all 1 mile apart and have names instead of numbers. At first the city planners used President’s names for the E-W streets. After they ran out of Presidents, city planners used names of prominent Phoenicians and notable farms, ranches or landmarks.

Indian School Road is named for The Phoenix Indian School, an actual school for the city’s Indian children which opened in the 1890’s.  Thankfully, Phoenicians figured out segregation and forced Anglo-ization of Indian children was a pretty awful policy and the school was closed (but not until 1988).

Bethany Home Road is named for the the old Bethany Home, a mental institution. Etc. (I’m almost afraid to do any more research into Phoenix street names, for fear of finding more politically incorrect and/or shameful origins of street names.)

In high school Driver’s Ed class I remember being made to memorize the names of the streets from Baseline Road on the south end of town to Beardsley Road which was, at that point in time, the northernmost edge of metro Phoenix. We also had to memorize the north-south range number assigned to each street.

McDowell Road is 1600 North, Thomas is 2900 North, Indian School is 4100 North, Camelback is 5000 North, etc. At the time I thought it was the stupidest thing I’d ever done. Now? With 20+ years of driving around Phoenix under my belt, I realize that anybody can be their own GPS system if they memorize the East-West range markers. Check them out here, on local artist Brad Hall’s awesome website about historic Phoenix.

How to Work the Grid


Let’s say you have to get to 2917 E. Camelback Road in Phoenix. It’s on the east side of town because of the E so you’ll be dealing with Streets, not Avenues. You know Camelback is 5000 North. And the 2917 tells you it’s at 29th Street. So it’s 2900 east and 5000 north. Essentially, if you know which are the major streets, you can vector your way from anywhere to 2917 E Camelback Road.

Every Rule Has Exceptions


Outside the boundaries of Phoenix proper, the rules for street names and number ranges change. Other Valley towns made their own street names, grids and rules. And sometimes within Phoenix boundaries, the street name changes mid-town just to keep you on your toes. Dunlap becomes Olive. Glendale Avenue becomes Lincoln Drive.

Cave Creek Road and Grand Avenue cut through Phoenix crosswise, on angles going northeast-southwest, or northwest-southeast. Again, I’m pretty certain someone thought this would just keep things interesting. Where Cave Creek and Grand cross ‘normal’ streets that go N-S or E-W you get a 5-point intersection. And more, bigger shopping strip malls.

Which leads me to the single most useful description I’ve ever devised for explaining metro Phoenix to folks from other towns: Phoenix is one immense suburb liberally studded with strip malls and numbered in a regular, predictable pattern.

We also have about 300 days of sunshine per year, no natural disasters, lots of outdoor recreational spots, and a generally pretty darn friendly population. Nearly everybody living here is from somewhere else. Personally I think that makes folks friendlier.

If you’re new to metro Phoenix, welcome! Hope this and other posts about getting around Phoenix are useful. If you’re ready to become a Phoenix area homeowner, contact us. If you’re thinking about moving here but not quite ready to call a Realtor, browse around. You might especially like our Moving page.
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Blogging From The Bus

I had to take the bus the other day. Various reasons why, and while not looking forward to it, I decided to make the most of it. Mobile blog post!


IMG_1730


I walked about 1/4 mile from my house to the bus stop and hopped on the number 7 bus going north. North-South bus routes are often named for the street they’re traveling; I was going north on 7th Street.


As I rode, I got a chance to look around me at the scenery, which I rarely get to do. Phoenix is a very car-dependent town and I’m a Realtor so I’m nearly always in the driver’s seat when I go anywhere.


Part of Phoenix’s car-dependence is because we’re hyoooge! It’s easily 75 miles from the upper reaches of Surprise in the Northwest to the outskirts of Queen Creek in the Southeast. Easily.


Another reason metro Phoenix is car-dependent is because it’s so stinking hot in the summer. This is an extreme climate. Imagine Calgary or the interior of Alaska in the winter, imagine it’s opposite and you have Phoenix in May through September. Heck, just imagine The Outback (the region, not the restaurant).


Back to the bus ride and scenery.


IMG_1731


This is a not-very-good picture of a major intersection shopping center. They’re all pretty much built on the same concept: major anchor store such as Target, WallMart or a supermarket surrounded by strip-mall type shops including food and retailers. This particular shopping center is at 7th Street and Bell Road.


IMG_1732 This strip mall also has these shops: Teaching Tools, a discount shoe retailer, a T.G.I.Friday’s, Pier 1, Tuesday Morning and Anna’s Linens (both discount home goods), Pei Wei (casual Asian fusion dining), Blockbuster, 2 supermarkets, a couple of fast food joints, a hair salon, a bagel place, a Verizon Wireless retailer, a WaldenBooks, a Post Office & More-type shop and probably about 50 others that I’m forgetting. Essentially, you could live your life without ever shopping anywhere else.


I think the City aims to have a bus pass each stop on each major route about once every 20 to 30 minutes. I waited here at the “Bell Towne Centre” for about 10 minutes for my bus transfer. Bus stops are shaded structures whenever & wherever possible. You can just see the shade structure in the picture below.


IMG_1734 Picture of a bus stop shade structure taken from inside the bus.


Here’s a confession: I’m a big dork. Phoenix is a car town. I drive everywhere. I didn’t know how to work the little bus fare chippy- receiving thingy they have on buses nowadays. I didn’t even know how much the fare was.


I knew enough to know I needed a transfer, because the buses go North-South or East-West and I had to go northwest. I figured surely $2 was enough, right? Wrong. It’s $2.50 for 1 adult, all-day bus pass with unlimited transfers.


So I get on the bus a little nervous, with my money in hand. I’ve got 2 singles or a five-spot. I don’t want to mess it up, to hold up the bus and all these other people. I’ve got all day to get to the auto shop but they’ve got schedules and deadlines to meet.



Me (to the bus driver): How much to 19th Avenue & Bell?
Driver: $2.50
Me: Will it make change?
Driver: No
Me: (digging in change purse, spilling pennies on the floor, debating about spending my entire $5)
Driver: <sigh>
Me: No, wait! I got it, here! <more pennies hit the floor>
Driver: <closing door, more sighing> OK, that’s it, you’re done.

The driver took my money at that point, put it in the fare box and handed me my ticket. The rest of the bus ride was uneventful.


Except for that part about choosing where to sit. The bus was surprisingly full, and I was instantly transported back in time to elementary school – should I sit next to the fat kid who probably smells? or next to the band geek with his tuba strapped on? Or next to that poor girl who has to wear full headgear 24-7 for the next 5 years until her braces come off? Needless to say, I sat up front with the rest of the dorks, geeks and castoffs from the Island of Misfit Toys, where I belong.


As I said, the rest of my bus expedition was uneventful and the car’s new brakes are killer. I hoped someone would get a little smile out my dorky bus-riding story. And maybe it’ll illustrate what a totally car dependent town Phoenix is. You can confirm that by checking the WalkScore of your neighborhood.


Meanwhile, riding the bus and writing this post gave me the idea for a post about how Phoenix is laid out on a big grid. That makes driving around town completely easy, and I’ll have more on that tomorrow.


PS – While researching this post I found the coolest website about historic Phoenix! Check out BradHallArt.com which is full of pics of historic Phoenix, Valley National Bank memorbilia and old maps of the Valley of the Sun.

Not a Superbowl Watcher?

I'm sure that I'm not the only person who won't be watching tomorrow's big Superbowl game.  If you're looking for something else to do tomorow besides eat too much fattening food and consume too many alcoholic beverages while watching extremely well paid large men pummel each other (not that there's anything wrong with that)... 


try a hike at one of the Valley's many natural preserve mountain parks.


These are some pictures from my recent hike of Shaw Butte trail 306 in North Phoenix.  It's a 4 mile roundtrip hike that City Parks and Recreation labels moderate to difficult. There are some quite steep sections but the panoramic views from the peaks are worth it.


rocky-peaks


img_1569


cactus-silhouette


img_1574


Trailhead parking for North Mountain (including the Shaw Butte trail where I snapped these pics) is located at 7th Street just north of Peoria (just south of Thunderbird) with a big visitors center on the west side of 7th Street. There's additional, limited trailhead parking at 7th Avenue and 15th Avenue just north of Peoria, and at Central Avenue just south of Thunderbird Road.


The day I was there a bunch of groups were hiking. One group looked like a Father-Son hike, another was clearly a dog lover's group hike. There was also a park ranger leading a nature hike through the park, and I overheard him pointing out local bushes and trees, and explaining how anything can manage to prosper and grow green in the Sonoran Desert. 


If you do take advantage of the Valley hiking opportunities, bring water. Most parks don't provide more than a few drinking fountains at the trailhead. Especially for out of town visitors, it's hard to guage how the extremely dry air in Phoenix will affect you. Firefighters are routinely called out to rescue hikers who overestimated their abilities or underestimated their water intake needs. Better safe than sorry. Click here for a list of the City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation hiking spots.


overlooking-south-phoenix-arizona



thunderbird-symbol-on-mountain

The photo above is a good illustration of what locals call The Brown Cloud. Unfortunately as metro Phoenix has grown in the past 10+ years, we've developed a pollution problem. We're not Beijing by any means but we've got a growing problem.  The City of Phoenix is tackling the air quality problems through various initiatives including increased spending on mass transit, using cleaner fuels in city buses, dust control measures on construction sites, and incentives for home builders who build "infill" projects.


About.com has a brief and informative article about what causes Phoenix's Brown Cloud problem. I'm particularly sensitive to the air quality in Phoenix and days that look like the photo above cause sinus headaches and congestion. But I know of many, many people who never give the Valley's air quality a second thought.


Aside from showing our Brown Cloud, the two photos above show how vast the Valley of the Sun is. The first looks over the southern section of the city; the second photo is of the Northwest Phoenix/Peoria/Glendale area. It's easy to spend 2 hours in a car driving from one corner of town to it's diagonal opposite. I've helped a lot of families relocate here from other parts of the country, and they universally tell me they were glad they heeded advice and found jobs before finding housing. Two hours in the car every day commuting to/from work is no fun!


Hope our readers enjoyed these shots of the beautiful, sunny and warm Valley of the Sun.

Friday Fun

Uber blogger Theresa Boardman does a Fridays are for Fun series. Since I'm totally exhausted this week, I'm shamelessly copying her style.


Henceforth (or at least until I forget I made this mini-resolution), Fridays are for Fun here at the North Phoenix Agent blog.


As a Realtor, I drive a lot. I mean A LOT. This? Warmed the cockles of my heart.




[caption id="attachment_1889" align="alignnone" width="300" caption="Woot Woot!"]Woot Woot![/caption]

I filled the tank of my Jeep Wrangle for just over $31. I can't remember the last time I did that. When gas prices peaked at near $4 a gallon, I was plunking down a cool $80 to fill the tank. It's not like I could put clients into a gas-efficient subcompact either. So I grin and bear it. But when I filled up this afternoon I did a little jig of joy.


Have a great weekend y'all!